Jazz Age Wednesdays 4 — In the Pip of Time

Camel Walk cutoutWednesday, October 4, 2017

Welcome back to Jazz Age Wednesday.  I’m celebrating a wonderful review of Murder at the Bijou — Three Ingredients I   by Molly Flanders!

on September 28, 2017
This is a very enjoyable murder story set in the 1920s. Pip, Granny Phanny and a whole bunch of alliterated characters populate the story of surprisingly strong suspense with equally surprising turns of events.
This is hugely enjoyable and definitely recommended to anyone with a sense of fun and humour.

I loved this book when it was published in parts on the blog and loved it even more re-reading it as a whole in one sitting. Yes, one sitting.

I only now realised just how much work had gone into the individual parts. I often forgot from one week to the next what certain references mean or what they allude to. The novel is hugely enjoyable and a fun read thanks to many quirky expressions, usage of words off the beaten track, fabulous character names and many more delicious ingredients.

The writing is very original and the story line is fun and always manages to surprise you. 

That’s in part because of the randomness of the supplies ingredients, but also due to the author’s creative powers.

I’m so glad this was released as novel so I can enjoy the continuity and appreciate just how well composed this ‘fragmented’ story actually is.

Molly, I am overjoyed that you enjoyed the novel version, and delighted that you were “in the Model-T” for the serial.

Even though this video is not from the 1920s, let’s get up and dance for a minute! 

Awhile back, I did a joint post with author John W. Howell.  He has just launched a wonderful new novel, Circumstances of Childhood.  But it was one of John’s hilarious lists of what not to do gave me the “things” for this story.  My random “things” for this pantser story were Counterfeiting, Time, and Hollywood.

It’s another “hump day” and another short adventure with our flapper, Pip.  At the Bijou Theatre, things get a little weird…

In the Pip of Time

Aelita_1924_still_04

“Aelita, Queen of Mars” was playing at the Bijou Theatre.  I was brand new in town and my pal Alastair Wong invited me to go to the show with a group of his friends.  However, the friends cancelled.  To my surprise, Granny Phanny and Dr. Veronica Vale took the tickets.  At first I couldn’t understand why they would want to see a science fiction film about a soldier, an inventor, and a police informant taking the first flight to Mars.

Veronica reminded Alastair and me that she and Granny had been, and basically would always be suffragettes.  They encouraged films with strong female characters.  Of course, in this story, Aelita is not what she at first seemed and things end badly for her.  Nonetheless she was a strong character and the two older women wanted to see the show.

Afterward, Granny and Veronica were still animatedly discussing the story as we walked out of the Bijou.  Alastair and I were fascinated by the Hollywood “movie magic” that created the Martian city and the spaceship.  As you might expect our discussion was more whimsical than that of the older generation.

“What if somebody from Mars came here?” Alastair pondered.

250px-Princess_of_Mars_large

I always got a kick out of Alastair’s mildly British accent.  So I was already smiling when I told him Martians would have a tough time fitting in with humans.  It was doubtful that anybody would think they were the bee’s knees! 

A man wearing a bizarre metal hat and strange clothes burst out of the theater.  He tried to close a fancy briefcase as he ran.  Several bills flew out of it.  He grabbed most of them, but I noticed the breeze took one over to a planter.  The man just kept running until he rounded the corner of the Bijou.

Out of curiosity, Alastair and I followed him to the dead end alley behind the theater.  We backed against the wall, when a moment later a woman ran after him.  She had pointy cone shaped things over her ears.  Though no one was with her, she spoke as if in conversation with someone.  She held something that must have been a large gun, although it didn’t look quite like any shooter I’d ever seen.  She pointed it at the man and yelled for him to stop.

Gods_of_Mars-1918 Edgar Rice Burroughs

Then she fired the gun — I think.  At least she pointed it and seemed to shoot it, but I didn’t see it do anything.  However, the trash can six feet ahead of the guy exploded.  He looked at her fearfully, but he kept running.  So she threw a whirling thingamajig at his feet, causing him to fall.

The woman jumped on him, with her knee in his back, pinning him to the ground.  She muttered something about “low-life securities thief.”  He grunted at the pressure from her knee.

Then she spotted Alastair and me.  We shrank further against the wall.  The odd gun looked even bigger when she pointed it at us.  That bearcat had a fierce glare, I can tell you.  To my astonishment she abruptly started laughing.

Sci Fi Costume 1920s woman.png

“I could warn you not to tell anyone what you just saw,” she stopped chortling long enough to say.  “But if you did, they’d think you were insane.”

Still chuckling, she touched one of the pointy cones that covered her ears.  She and the man disappeared into thin air!  It was as if they had never been there at all — except for the exploded remains of the trash can.

Alastair and I exchanged wide eyed looks, speechless.  He made an obviously uncomfortable attempt at laughing.

“Those Hollywood types.  They’ll do anything to promote a film.”

“But there was nobody to see that but us,” I managed to say, though it was more of a squeak.  “It wouldn’t be much of a promo.”

I headed back around the corner, remembering the paper that fell out of the odd man’s briefcase.  The man had missed one and I saw it land in a planter.  I plucked it out of the greenery.

“That looks like mazuma,” Alastair whispered.  “Cash money!  But it’s not any currency I’ve ever seen.  Maybe it’s counterfeit.”

Inspecting it closely I nodded and turned the paper over to read both sides.  “It says ‘Federal Reserve Note’ but you’re right.  It must be counterfeit.  It’s odd looking, but even if it was from some other country, they’ve got the date wrong.  It says 2419.  As if maybe somebody transposed the date.”

Alastair and I continued to stare at one another.  Now and then one or the other of us would take a breath, start to say something, and then shrug mutely.

Finally I summoned the only words I could.  “I wouldn’t mind getting spifflicated about now.”

Alastair agreed.

The end.

***

1920s Man on Moon Drinking

If you want to know more about the characters in the 1920s culinary mystery, Murder at the Bijou, Three Ingredients-I, click here

Bijou front only 2

Murder at the Bijou — Three Ingredients I

Novel-book-The Three Things Serial Story-Teagan Riordain Geneviene-The Writer Next Door-Vashti Q-spotlight-author

The Three Things Serial Story: A Little 1920s Story Kindle 

Thanks so very much for visiting.  You’re the cat’s pajamas!

 

Copyright © 2017 by Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene

All rights reserved.

No part of this work may be reproduced, scanned, or distributed in any printed or electronic form without permission.  Please do not participate in or encourage piracy of copyrighted materials in violation of the author’s rights. 

 

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75 thoughts on “Jazz Age Wednesdays 4 — In the Pip of Time

  1. Congratulations, dear Teagan, and well-deserved!!! Thank you for sharing this all, almost missed it, but glad to say I didn’t (no thanks to WordPress, grrrr). Had to share and hope the rest of your week flies by (not the good bits).
    Mega jazz hands hugs xoxoxoxox

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, WordPress has become a real thorn in the side for me. No worries Donna. I’m happy you found the post though. 😀
      Thanks for very much. That review made my week! I appreciate you so much! You’re the cat’s pajamas. Hugs.

      Like

  2. I love the thought of getting spifflicated. Seems like a purposeful endeavor rather than an accidental offshoot of casual consumption. Thank you for the lovely mention as well, Teagan. Hugs. I have to get to Murder at the Bijou soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. A fantastic and very well deserved review. I haven’t started in book form yet, but will do and when I do will let you know. It’s a little like a beautiful desert or pudding as we say over here….i’t s special treat that has to be read/eaten at the right time 🙂 You are one of the most imaginative and creative people I know. Sending you huge hummingbird hugs this day. Janet 🙂 xxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Olga, it’s so good to see you. Thank you! You already know I was concerned about how good the book would be without all the illustrations and fun links — not to mention the recipes. So I’m psyched and excited, but I’m also relieved!
      I imagine all the upheaval around the election is disturbing to you. I hope you’re doing well. Huge hugs.

      Like

    • Hi Fraggle. I’m glad you enjoyed it. Yes, isn’t it a great video! The editing is outstanding to get so many different clips to match perfectly with the song. I was amazed. Happy “hump day” and enjoy the rest of the week. You’re the bee’s knees!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. A little time in the travel there. Once you figured out how to travel time, hiding in another time would add interest to crime, investigation and punishment.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Tim, it’s great to see you. Thanks for capping off our evening with a visit here.
      Yes, time travel sure would complicate things for law enforcement! I wonder what they’d have to do about (I need more coffee — can’t think of the word) crimes where the time limit has expired. (Yes, coffee… It wasn’t the best night. Every time I drifted off I went back into a weird horror movie my mind was manufacturing.)
      Have a wonder-filled Wednesday. You’re the cat’s meow.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Statute of limitations (SOL) — I think that was the word your coffee deprived mind was trying to remember. It took a few sips of coffee to get my rickety mind in gear as well. I think our brains believe there is a statute of limitations on trying to recall things before the sun has come up like SOL — Yes SOL would be a problem, especially when you travel back to a time before you committed the crime. There would have to be a “statute of primordial intentions” meaning that in one’s pre-existence one had planned or was pre-disposed to commit the crime in the future. Hmmm! I might be giving lawmakers some bad ideas here.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I finally had some down time yesterday and I cracked open the spine and began reading my copy of Murder at the Bijou. I only got halfway through chapter 7 before #1 Grandson had had enough of quiet time and I had to tuck in my bookmark and close the book. I hated doing that! I love Pip, and Granny Phanny! I’m looking forward to finding more clues, and figuring out this who-dun-it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Deborah. You’ve lifted me over the Wednesday hump with this comment! I’m so happy you’ve enjoyed the novel so far. It was fun letting the “ingredients” create so many varied clues and characters. Then I reached a point where I knew they all had to come together! That took a bit of doing — and a lot of going back through the chapters looking for innuendos I might have missed myself! LOL.
      Congrats again on finding and obtaining your dream retirement home. I hope all the details go smoothly. You’re the cat’s pajamas!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I wonder if Pip will actually learn to cook/bake? Or if she’ll relocate permanently? 🙂 Don’t tell me! I want to find out slowly as I read it.

        Baby Girl always reads the last chapter first. That DRIVES ME CRAZY!!! If I did that I wouldn’t want to read the previous chapters. I don’t get it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • LOL, I think Pip is a “continuous learner,” Deborah. She’ll always have new adventures of one kind or another. I expect that throughout her life she will always *think* Granny was the better cook, regardless of whether it is true. 😉
          I confess that some times I turn to the end of a book first — but only to make sure a favorite character survived. I don’t like stories where my favorites are killed off. I firmly believe it takes more talent to keep a character alive and interesting than to kill one. But I’m only in it for fun! 😀 Have a thriving Thursday!

          Liked by 1 person

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