Three Things Serial Goes to Mars?

young-lucille-ball-pensive-peach

Young Lucille Ball as Pip

In my novella, The Three Things Serial – a Little 1920s Story, Pip dubs one of her friends “the astronaut man.”  That character is Andy Avis and he writes science fiction stories (hence Pip’s nickname for him).  He happens to have a gigantic crush on Mona.250px-Princess_of_Mars_large

In the novella, Andy is working on a re-imagining of A Princess of Mars.  That is a science fantasy novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs.  Andy would cast Mona in the titular part as Dejah Thoris.

Now, that is not the focus of the novella — it is a very small aspect of the story.  However, I thought it would be fun to let you know more about it.  Science Fiction was coming into its own in the Jazz Age with silent films.  

Edgar Rice Burroughs, of course, became famous before the 1920s.  He published A Princess of Mars in 1912.  If you are interested, you can get the book free at Project Gutenberg.  YouTube boasts several offerings of the entire seven hour audio book as well.

I can imagine Pip having all kinds of crazy dreams after reading Andy’s screenplay. 

The red and green Martian armies likely battled through Pip’s slumber.  She might have drifted from the Edgar Rice Burroughs vision of Mars to become the Queen of Space in “Aelita, Queen of Mars” and fall in love  with an earth man (who probably looked a lot like Frankie).

Or she might have dreamed of going to a futuristic city with all her friends, Andy, Mona, Boris, and Frankie. “Just Imagine” how they might have envisioned the year 1980.  (No, this video is not from the 20s, but it is from 1930. Full movie.)

They sort of missed the mark there, but I guess that depends on how you look at it.  However, I continue to be intrigued by the number of modern ideas that existed in Pip’s day.  cracker-jack-ad-vintage

They didn’t have concession stands inside theaters back then, but there was likely a snack bar or cafe next door.  Some movie houses allowed vendors to hawk popcorn or peanuts in the aisles.  Horsefeathers, they probably munched on Cracker Jacks!

Here’s a recipe for Cracker Jacks from Add a Pinch, in case you don’t have a box handy.

cracker-jacks-vintage-open

Thanks for taking this little jaunt through present-future-past with me.  Mega hugs!

 

Copyright © 2017 by Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene

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No part of this book may be reproduced, scanned, or distributed in any printed or electronic form without permission.  Please do not participate in or encourage piracy of copyrighted materials in violation of the author’s rights.

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88 thoughts on “Three Things Serial Goes to Mars?

  1. I love that you introduced me to Edgar Rice Burroughs and I’ll check out the free book! As for the mention of Cracker Jacks, that made me smile because I remember they were such a treat as a teenager 😀 They’d get stuck in my teeth though lol. Happy Friday ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh they were devilish about getting stuck in the teeth, weren’t they! 😀 I’m glad I could make that introduction, Christy. There’s a ton of great stuff on Project Gutenberg. It can be difficult to search… Sometimes I just take a sort of pot luck pick and see how I like it. Happy Friday to you too. Mega hugs.

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  2. The video were fantastic, I especially liked the second. I don’t know why, I’ve never though that SF films were a thing in the 1920s, but it looks like they were well-done. Well… at least some of them, I suppose 😉

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    • Oh yes, certainly when you consider the level of their technology. I ran into several when doing research for the blog serials, so I went looking for them to use in this post. I’m fascinated by their perception of things.
      Many thanks for visiting, Sarah. Happy lunar new year. Hugs.

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    • Absolutely, Noelle. It’s so fun.
      In the kind of technical editing /writing I do, often I’m actually a Technical Communicator. So I’m always fascinated by the different perceptions people and groups have, when you look closely.
      Many thanks for taking a moment to comment. Mega hugs.

      Liked by 1 person

        • 🙂 No, I don’t freelance. It used to be a good career. However, in the past 20 years I’ve seen it decline steadily. Now tech writing and editing has come to be seen as unimportant by the techies who disdain good writing (and there are a lot more of them than you would think, maybe most of them). So as a field it gets no respect, and is often equated with secretarial work.
          I advise people not to enter the field unless they have a true passion for it. In the past ten years, I’ve seen the skill level applied to various aspects of it drop lower and lower, until what used to pay well is now considered entry level work. Most senior level jobs (that actually include a salary in the postings) pay less than I made 15 years ago.
          I’ve scraped and earned my way to what must be the height of my technical career — and that equates to only a middle management level to other fields/people. In other words, the ceiling is low. :/

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          • You clearly have drive and stick-to-it ness in tons, Teagan. I did scientific writing for my whole career. As I got to the end, and was reviewing papers for journals as I had always done, I found the writing of such poor quality that I found myself editing for syntax, grammar and spelling as much as for scientific content!
            I admire you for your strength of purpose!

            Liked by 1 person

            • Thank you for your kind words, Noelle. That’s exactly the kind of thing I encounter. I see so many people in advanced positions (making easily 60% more than I’m paid) who can’t write a simple sentence. A few of them realize their shortcomings and play to their strengths, depending on me and respecting my skills. The majority disdain the entire field. Okay — I will step down from my Julia Sugarbaker soapbox now. 😀

              Liked by 1 person

  3. I often wonder what my Grandparents would have made of an iPad or an Apple watch, Teagan. An elderly Aunt of mine, who is 90 next month, can’t get her head around of me showing her my blog on the internet. “How has your book got in there?” and “how do these people leave you messages? Do they have to pay postage?” are just some of her questions she has asked. I expect I’ll be asking similar questions in 40 years time. 😀
    Hugs to you.
    xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ha! Adorably funny, Hugh. Everyone waiting here at the car dealership’s service waiting room is wondering what I could possibly be smiling about. 🙂
      Thanks so much for this comment.
      Wish me luck getting my car fixed…

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  4. Great post, Teagan. I loved all of the videos. Just yesterday my husband and I were talking about how much has changed since the early 1900’s and how our grandparents could never have imagined what our lives would be like today (of course, it is hard for us to imagine what their’s were really like). Very interesting post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so very much, Michelle. You’ve brought me a smile after a headache filled night. Just the “ordinary” day-to-day differences are mind boggling to me. I wouldn’t want to imagine not having indoor plumbing! 😀 Mega hugs.

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  5. Great post….I have read Edgar Rice Burroughs…big fan. I hadn’t thought about how the future was seen back then in a number of years….that and the Cracker Jacks took me back to my youth! Great post! Hope all is well!

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  6. I love these videos and made sure to eat a big box of Cracker Jack (I loved it) as I watched:):) Hope you have recovered from the weekend, and that you are keeping warm….Thick fog, frost and cold here – but I plan to stay in and paint….xxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Janet, thank you! I’m delighted you enjoyed this post. But it’s me wishing you warmth. It’s been mild for January. Although today it’s pouring rain (and all day) — and the trunk in my new car leaks! I really, really miss the desert. I see you have a new post — clicking over now. Enjoy your day of painting. Hummingbird hugs!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes indeed. That’s my reaction to many things I find in the 1920s. In the “Imagine” film where the planes were flying (heavy air traffic) in a city… seems laughable — at first. They couldn’t possibly imagined how much the population would grow. Allowing for that, it was a reasonable assumption/guess. Such fun. I’m delighted you enjoyed it, Andrea. Mega hugs!

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  7. Cracker Jack here was a tv show on BBC in the 70’s..Though it had food.. lol.. as the kids were asked questions they won food prizes, which they had to hold onto.. if they answered it wrong they got a cabbage.. Its on YouTube 🙂 .. The Queen of Mars I had not seen.. 🙂 xxx

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  8. Lovely post Teagan. It is very interesting to see how people conceived the future in the early 1900’s. I don’t know if you have ever read John Wyndham’s science fiction books but some of them are a bit creepy in how accurately he foresaw certain things like chemical and nuclear warfare.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s great to see you Robbie. Thanks for taking a moment to comment. Wyndham sounds familiar. In my late teens I found a lot of pioneering science fiction books on a bargain table and devoured them. You’re right about the amazing foresight and the creepy factor. Now I enjoy many Victorian era mysteries and sci-fy I find at Project Gutenberg. Have a wonder-filled week. Mega hugs!

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  9. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Just catching up on my Sunday reading.. books and blogs.. I have created this little oasis on Sundays now because I was getting behind on the essential reading… I know that most of your are as much a fan as I am of Teagan Geneviene’s Three Things Serial and her recently published Novella and today she picks up on a snippet that was mentioned in the book.. The lovely Andy and a trip to mars…

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Mmmm, this got me thinking, especially today, makes me think Mars, aliens, ‘Braindead’ with Tony Shalhoub (I miss ‘Monk’ so much) , it could explain a lot of what’s happens – I guess no one could have imagined this future, then again, truth is always stranger than fiction. I was also thinking of Tim Burton’s ‘Mars Attacks!’ then I got distracted by Cracker Jacks. lol
    This post was a pip, dear friend, I may have to reread ‘A Princess of Mars’, it’s been many years, thanks for the reminder.
    Hope this weekend is treating you well, Teagan (all things considered). Today and everyday I’m proud to be a #NastyWoman from any planet. 😉
    Mega just imagining hugs xoxoxo

    Liked by 1 person

    • And I’m proud to stand beside you, Donna — here, on Mars, or anywhere, wearing my bright pink pu– erm kitty cat hat. (Couldn’t they have told us about the hats in advance? I ordered one but won’t get it until March… But I expect there will be four years of use for it ahead.)
      I’ve been missing Monk too recently.
      Thanks so very much for visiting here and brightening this dull drizzly day. Mega hugs!

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  11. What a fun and interesting post! I have a first edition Edgar Rice Burroughs book, “Back to the Stone Age” published in 1937. It is one of my treasured first edition book finds. I bought a replicate dust jacket with mylar to protect the book itself from any further damage. xoxo

    Liked by 2 people

  12. I love your imagination, Teagan. I hope Pip appreciates the writer penning her very existence! Love the videos. Queen Aelita’s tiara is outrageous! The Cracker Jack images made me nostalgic. This was an enjoyable journey through your imagination as well as a lovely trip down memory lane 🙂 Hugs ♥

    Liked by 2 people

    • It’s great to see you Geoff. Ha! I love the rocket to the moon thing. Netflix even had it.
      There’s “no joy in Mudville” today… Maybe I’ll go and watch the moon thing now. 😀 But a jolly spiffing weekend to you too! Mega hugs.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I have to come back and watch the video’s. It’s really fascinating seeing how the future was imagined in the 1920’s, the costumes the characters are wearing make me smile, can you imagine if we all dressed like that. I enjoy the work of Edgar Rice Burroughs, especially his Tarzan. Always love it when I see you in my inbox!! Mega hugs!!!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for getting aboard the time/spaceship, David. Yes I’m well. The intense amount of low flying air traffic is distressing. However, a frequent urge to vomit goes away when I stop looking at the news. (Joking. But not joking about the air traffic.)
      I’m always happy to know I’ve given you a bit of sunshine. Mega hugs!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I’m a big fan of Edgar Rice Burroughs – I have most of his books in ebook format! I found them on iBooks as freebies. He was a very good writer and I’m impressed with his imaginings from a century ago. Interesting post, Teagan!

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Royalty on other planets – I guess there’s no reason to think intelligent life would be any different anywhere else. Thaks for some interesting videos to look at (it’s going to rain tonight). Have a great weekend!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for dropping by, Dan. “A Princess of Mars” was a much better book than I expected. I’ve come to enjoy Victorian mysteries and science fiction books, and find tons of them at Project Gutenberg. I hope you enjoy the videos. I can only take silent films in small doses, but it can be fun. Happy weekend hugs.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Wow, an interesting fact about the subject of your post, Teagan. My Grandfather Ryan, who lived in Dublin, was a great Edgar Rice Burroughs fan and he passed on his love of his books to my Mam, who in turn passed them onto me and my brother, (Huge hugs)

    Liked by 2 people

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